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PAPER OF THE MONTH: Anti-Nogo-A Antibodies As a Potential Causal Therapy for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction after Spinal Cord Injury

May 1, 2020With comment by Naoki Yoshimura:
Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) induces lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) such as detrusor overactivity and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD), potentially leading to life-threatening consequence. This study [...]
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PAPER OF THE MONTH: MicroRNAs as potential biomarkers to predict the risk of urinary retention following intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxin‐A injection

May 1, 2020With comment by Naoki Yoshimura:
Intradetrusor injection of onabotulinumtoxin‐A (onaBoNT‐A) has been used for the treatment of refractory OAB, but sometimes results in high post-void residual urine volume (PVR) after the treatment. This study [...]
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PAPER OF THE MONTH: An effective evidence‐based cleaning method for the safe reuse of intermittent urinary catheters: In vitro testing

Apr 1, 2020With comment by Blayne Welk:
While there is good agreement that CIC represents the ideal method of managing a bladder that fails to empty, the optimal way to do CIC is still a subject of debate. The options around single use/multiple use, and the relative benefit of different types of catheter coatings are still debated. [...]
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PAPER OF THE MONTH: Do appreciable changes in the upper extremity motor capability to perform clean intermittent catheterization come about with time after traumatic spinal cord injury?

Aug 21, 2019Comment by Howard Goldman:

Bladder management is one of the key concerns after a patient has suffered a spinal injury. If reasonable spontaneous voiding is not possible, clean intermittent catheterization is the preferred avenue of management when possible.
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PAPER OF THE MONTH: Anticholinergic Drug Exposure and the Risk of Dementia: A Nested Case-Control Study

Jul 15, 2019Comment by Marcio Averbeck:

There is increasing evidence for a possible causal association between the chronic use of anticholinergics and the risk of developing dementia. The inherent limitation for establishing such causal nexus is precisely the fact that the prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms and the prescription of antimuscarinics tends to increase in older individuals, exactly in the same age groups in which the incidence of dementia is higher. [...]
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