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PAPER OF THE MONTH: Reasons for cessation of clean intermittent catheterization after spinal cord injury: Results from the Neurogenic Bladder Research Group spinal cord injury registry

Aug 13, 2020With comment by Mario Averbeck:
The NBRG registry is a prospective observational study examining neurogenic‐bladder related QoL among individuals after SCI. Participants were recruited throughout the United States and Canada, answering telephonic interviews and electronic questionnaires. Progressive and congenital neurologic disorders were exclusion criteria.[...]
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CONTROVERSY IN NEURO-UROLOGY: Is there any relationship between Covid-19 and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS)?

Aug 1, 2020
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PAPER OF THE MONTH: Urological presentations of adult primary tethered cord syndrome

Jul 7, 2020With comment by Howard Goldman:
All of us are familiar with patients who have neurourological manifestations of tethered cord syndrome related to congenital spinal dyraphism. Far less common are symptoms related to tethered cord that present in adults previously unknown to have any spinal anomaly. [...]
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INUS Annual Congress 2022

Jun 30, 2020Do you want to become the local organizer of the INUS Annual Congress 2022? We are looking forward to your application by July 31st.
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PAPER OF THE MONTH: Do appreciable changes in the upper extremity motor capability to perform clean intermittent catheterization come about with time after traumatic spinal cord injury?

Aug 21, 2019Comment by Howard Goldman:

Bladder management is one of the key concerns after a patient has suffered a spinal injury. If reasonable spontaneous voiding is not possible, clean intermittent catheterization is the preferred avenue of management when possible.
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PAPER OF THE MONTH: Anticholinergic Drug Exposure and the Risk of Dementia: A Nested Case-Control Study

Jul 15, 2019Comment by Marcio Averbeck:

There is increasing evidence for a possible causal association between the chronic use of anticholinergics and the risk of developing dementia. The inherent limitation for establishing such causal nexus is precisely the fact that the prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms and the prescription of antimuscarinics tends to increase in older individuals, exactly in the same age groups in which the incidence of dementia is higher. [...]
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